How to Manage Brain Freeze.

It is horrible in an exam when the stuff you learnt does not come to the front of your brain. I certainly had that happen more than once.

Obviously, the better prepared you are, the better you should be able to recall the material that you need.

Sometimes, when you have brain freeze, you need to tease out the material that you know is in there, but seems to be hiding around the back of your brain. This is where the power of mind-maps can help you.

If you are having trouble remembering all the parts of a theory or a framework that you need to answer a question I recommend trying to lay it out on the notes page on the left-hand side of your book.

The whole point of a mind-map is to help your thinking processes. The process of drawing out the mind-map can help you remember the other bits that are required to complete it. This is obviously especially useful if you have used mind-maps to help with your exam preparation. This will mean that you are re-creating something that you have done (hopefully) many times before.

This also is part of the reason why it is so important to write out the theories, frameworks and examples of evidence as a big part of your exam preparation. The physical act of re-writing these models helps you remember all the aspects to it.

If, in lectures, a particular framework or model is drawn in a certain way it may be useful to practice drawing it in the same way. This means that when you come to throw down the model you can visualize it as you write it down. Also, if you do get some brain-freeze, by drawing out the shape and structure of the model, this can help you remember the bits that you have forgotton.

Some students may prefer to write out dotpoint lists instead of mind-maps. The important thing is to have a way of physically writing out the models so that you can then use them in the exam.

Summary.

Summary